Welcome to 2015

It’s the time of the year to contemplate what happened last year,  predict what will happen this year, make your resolutions and plans. Here’s my take on the retrospectives, predictions and resolutions I’ve found around the web.

Restrospectives

If we are what we search, then Google has the answer.

The lead stories include some interesting conclusions; apparently we’re optimistic, searching for “MH370 found” 14 times more often than “MH370 lost”.

Other sites focused on images of the year, Time produced their top 10 images, while CNN could only limit itself to 147 – it’s a sobering look back at the year with shocking photos of thousand of Syrian refugees, Gaza, riots, ebola victims, Boko Haram and ISIS. It’s been a tough year. There were some positives; Malala Yousafzai, a child rescue, Rosetta the comet.

Predictions

There’s always a danger in making predictions, particularly as this is the year we were supposed to be getting hoverboards according to the movie “Back to the Future”.

For some digitally relevant predictions

  • Econsultancy sees advances in online sales, increase in apps and mobile, and the rise of analytics.
  • V8 predicts the rise of analytics and the downfall of smart watches.
  • Social Media Examiner thinks that video will be the content format of choice (I’ve heard this before, many times, maybe this time it will be right), growth in slideshare for business and there’s a rise in niche social networks.

Resolutions

The other tradition at New Year is the “New Year’s Resolution”, that promise you make to yourself to improve your life. Apparently the most common relate to weight loss, saving money, quit smoking, and falling in love. Apparently only 8% of people keep their resolutions.

You can increase the chances of keeping any resolutions you do make by picking realistic goals, and by taking small steps that keep you motivated. The Greatist has some great ideas for inspiring wording of a resolution you can stick to.

Personally I don’t wait until New Year to make resolutions, if I want to change something I start working on it right away, and I aim for incremental, sustainable change. But this year I’ve taken the chance to affirm two professional resolutions I’m working on, and one personal one. I’m not going to list them here – it turns out disclosing your goals tricks your mind into thinking you’re going to succeed and you don’t try so hard as Derek Sivers explains in this TED talk.

So here’s to a fun year, welcome to 2015!

Advertisements

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s